12:31, December 27 32 0 usmagazine.com

2017-12-27 12:31:03

 

‘Mad About You’ Revival Is Reportedly in the Works
mad-about-you-revival
Paul Reiser and Helen Hunt in “Mad About You.” Getty Images

Another one of TV’s most beloved sitcoms may be making its way back to the small screen! A Mad About You reboot is in the works, TVLine reports. 

According to the outlet, multiple sources say that Sony has begun informal conversations with show leads Paul Reiser, who co-created the original series, and Helen Hunt.

While the original sitcom, which ran on NBC from 1992 to 1999, followed Reiser’s documentary filmmaker Paul and Hunt’s publicist Jamie navigating married life in New York City, TVLine reports that the new series would focus on the couple struggling with empty nest syndrome as their 17-year-old daughter, Mabel, is getting ready to leave for college.

Sources also confirm to The Hollywood Reporter that Sony Pictures Television Studios is eyeing the new series. However, no deals are in place and there is no network currently attached to the project. 

The beloved series received a Golden Globe and five Emmy awards during its time on the air. During the show’s seventh and final season, both Hunt and Reiser made $1 million per episode, according to THR.

The show would join other ‘80s and ‘90s sitcoms that have recently been rebooted, including Full HouseWill & Grace – which returned to NBC to huge ratings – and the forthcoming Rosanne revival. 

Much like Will & Grace, if the Mad About You revival follows the reported new story line, the show would be disregarding the decades forward time jump that the series finale ended on. In the two-part episode, Mabel was shown as an adult who, like her father, worked as a filmmaker. Mabel worked on an autobiographical film that showed Paul and Jamie separating and eventually coming back together.

Will & Grace star Eric McCormack opened up to Us Weekly and other reporters in August about the crew’s choice to ignore the NBC sitcom’s original ending when the new series picked up. “We’d done a finale that not only answered the questions, but made it impossible,” he said. “People saw that election video and what people responded to wasn’t just how funny that video was, but how the show looks the same and feels the same. And we went, ‘Oh that’s true! So why are we stuck with this ending that we gave it when we don’t have to be?’”